Mayan Spice Brownies- Gluten Free

Fudgy Mayan Spice Brownies
Uber Rich Mayan Spice Brownies

Ingredients:
1/4 c red quinoa (rinsed)

4 Tbspn Chai Seeds

2 Tbspn brown flax seeds

in just under 1 c water
(Your seeds will start to sprout)
Soak 8 – 12 hours at room temperature:

Directions:
Puree the above seeds and water in a blender or food processor till smooth and all the seeds

have disappeared, then blend or mix in remaining ingredients below.


Chocolatey Goodness


1/4 c melted butter (or coconut oil)
2 Tbsp honey (or agave nectar)
2 tsp (Mexican) vanilla
1 c sucanat (or brown sugar)
1 1/4 c cocoa
1/4 tsp sea salt
1/8 tsp baking soda

3 -5 Tablespoons of Mayan Spice Blend
OR

3 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp anise (optional)
1/2 tsp allspice
1/4 tsp cloves
1/8 tsp cayenne pepper

Grease a med/sm square pan and bake at 350 for about 30 minutes.
Cool to room temperature before cutting.
Store covered in the fridge.

For Mayan Spice Blend go to blog, https://sabrinaslatinkitchen.wordpress.com/2014/10/21/mayan-spice-blend/

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Papas Relllenas

Papas Rellenas
Papas Rellenas

Ingredients
2 lbs large potatoes (peeled and cut into quarters)
1 lb picadillo (seasoned ground beef)
Vegetable oil for frying
1 cup dry bread crumbs
4 eggs
1 tsp salt

Directions
Add salt to a pot of cold water, and boil the potatoes until they are soft. Drain the potatoes, and then mash them, then set aside to allow them to cool. Separate the egg yolks from the whites in two bowls. Mix the egg yolks into the mashed potato mixture, whisk the egg whites for a minute. Take a 1/4 of a cup of the mashed potatoes, and form it into a ball. Make a dent in the ball, to give it more of a bowl shape. Fill the indentation with a tablespoon of picadillo, and then reseal it. Reshape the potato as a ball again. Dip the ball in the egg whites, then roll the ball around in bread crumbs until it is coated. For a better coating, or for a crunchier texture, you may dip the ball into the egg whites again and coat it with another layer of bread crumbs. Refrigerate the potato balls for at least four hours before frying.To fry, pour enough oil into a skillet or frying pan to cover half of the balls, the oil should be at least 350°. Place several balls into the frying pan and cook on each side until golden brown, usually 2-3 minutes, taking care not to overcook. Drain the stuffed potatoes on paper towels, do not stack them. The other cooking method is to deep fry the papas rellenas at 375° until golden brown, they cook best deep-fried when they are frozen.

Ingredients

To Make the Picadillo:
1 lb ground meat
1 large onion, chopped
2-3 garlic cloves, chopped
1 small can tomato sauce
1/4 cup dry white wine
Pimiento stuffed olives
Salt and pepper to taste

In a large skillet, brown the ground meat, onions and garlic. If meat is not too lean, pour out whatever fat you render.turn heat down to medium low. Add the tomato sauce and wine. While it simmers, chop up the pimiento stuffed olives and add to meat mixture, it is ok to add a little bit of the brine, if you wish. Adjust the seasonings per taste.

Cardamom Chocolate Mousse

Cardamom Chocolate Mousse
Cardamom Chocolate Mousse

Enjoy my latest invention Chocolate combined with Cointreau, orange zest and Cardamom makes this is an elegant and quirky dessert.The exotic cardamom lends an air of sophistication and gives it a delicate pungency. Top with pistachios, pine nuts or almonds to give a nice texture. A very easy dish to make under 20 minutes.

Ingredients:
1 Bag of Chocolate Chips- ( I like Semi-Sweet Ghirardelli)
1 Can of Condensed Milk
2 Tablespoons Cardamom pods
2 Table Spoons to 1/4 Cup of Cointreau or Rum ( optional according to taste buds)
1 Tablespoon Orange Zest
1/4 Cup of Orange Juice
1/4 Cup Crushed Pistachios or Almonds

Instructions:

    1.Crush delicately Cardamom in a Mocajete or Mortar and Pestle
    Cardamom in Mocajete
    Cardamom in Mocajete

    2.Melt 1 Bag of Semi- Sweet Chocolate Chips in Double Boiler. Do it slowly. Set aside.

    Double Boiler
    Double Boiler

    2.Add 1 Cup of Condensed Milk mix until smooth and creamy
    3.Set aside and Let cool.
    4.When the chocolate mixture is room temperature,Put in Fridge in large 8 x 10 baking dish for 1 hour minimum.
    5. After 1 hour or when Chocolate Mixture has thickened take out of fridge and put Chocolate Mixture in Beautiful Dessert Crystal Glasses or any Fancy Cups
    6. Sprinkle with Pistachios.

    Voila you have an elegant dessert that’s easy to make and will impress your friends!

Gambas al Ajillio

Gambas Al Ajillio
Gambas Al Ajillio

Gambas al Ajillio – Sizzling Garlic Shrimp
A truly classic tapa, Gambas al Ajillio, a splash of brandy or sherry gives it a nice aromatic flavor. Top with crush pepper flakes gives a nice bite at the end. This is a quick and easy dish to make that will have your guests begging for more. What more can you ask for !

1/4 cup olive oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon paprika
1 pound medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 tablespoons dry sherry or lemon juice
salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped Italian flat leaf parsley

Directions
Heat olive oil, garlic, red pepper flakes, and paprika in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot and the garlic has turned golden brown, increase heat to high and add the shrimp. Cook until the shrimp turn pink and opaque, about 3 minutes. Deglaze the pan with sherry or lemon juice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve garnished with chopped parsley

Mayan Spice Truffles

MAYAN SPICE TRUFFLES
MAYAN SPICE TRUFFLES

Recipe:
1 Bag of Chocolate Chips
1 Can of Condensed Milk
2 Tablespoons of Mayan Spice Blend*
( See Recipe for Details)

Condiments for Coating:
Use 1 cup of Cocoa Powder, and Nuts
Nuts can be anything Sesame Seeds to Almonds, Pistachios

Instructions:

1.Melt 1 Bag of Semi- Sweet Chocolate Chips over Bain Marie ( Water Bath)
2.Add 1 Cup of Condensed Milk mix until smooth and creamy
3.Set aside and Let cool.
4.When the chocolate mixture is room temperature,Put in Fridge in large 8 x 10 baking dish for 1 hour minimum.
5.Take out fridge and with gloves, roll Chocolate into Mini Balls the size of a small ball
6.Set aside
7.Get Large Plate and spread with nut mixture
8. Get Chocolate Balls and swirl in mixture
9.put on Clean Plate
10.Put in Gift Boxes or store in fridge with a lid. They should keep for up to 1 week.

Your Truffles are ready now and make excellent gifts or treats to keep in fridge and pop in your mouth.
You can make all kinds of Truffles and get really creative. More later on this in Sabrina’s Latin Kitchen.

Spicy Turkey Paella

Spicy Turkey Paella

INGREDIENTS
12 ounces spicy smoked sausage (such as linguiça, andouille, or hot links), cut into 1/2-inch slices
1/4 cup garlic-flavored olive oil
2 large yellow onions, chopped
1 large red bell pepper, chopped
2 cups long-grain white rice
1/4 teaspoon saffron
4 cups low-salt chicken broth
4 large plum tomatoes, quartered
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
4 1/2 cups cooked leftover turkey, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1 cup frozen peas
PREPARATION
View Step-by-Step Directions
Preheat oven to 350°F. Brown sausage in large skillet over medium-high heat, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
Heat olive oil in 6 1/2-quart pot over medium-high heat. Add onions and cook until golden, stirring often, about 12 minutes. Add bell pepper; cook 3 minutes, stirring frequently. Stir in rice and saffron, then next 5 ingredients. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium; cover and cook 15 minutes. Add sausage, turkey, and peas to rice mixture. Bake paella 10 minutes and serve.
Test-kitchen tip: If you can’t find garlic-flavored olive oil, simply add a clove of minced garlic when you stir in the rice.

Part 1: History of Chocolate: Ancient Civilizations and the Cacao Bean

The divine drink, which builds up resistance and fights fatigue. A cup of this precious drink [cocoa] permits a man to walk for a whole day without food.” Montezuma II (1502-1520)

Cacao Bean before it gets processed into Chocolate
Cacao Bean before it gets processed into Chocolate

In the book,The True History of Chocolate, authors Sophie and  Michael Coe make a case that the earliest linguistic evidence of chocolate consumption stretches back three or even four millennia. The history of chocolate begins in MesoamericaChocolate, the fermented, roasted, and ground beans of the Theobroma cacao,can be traced to the Mokayaand other pre- Olmecpeoples,with evidence of cacao beverages dating back to to 1900 BC.

Near the beginning of the 16th century, the Aztecs were believed to first make chocolate, although it goes back much farther. The Mayans wrote about cacao ( Ka-Kow) a Mayan word on their pottery as early as 500 A.D., but some believe chocolate dates back to a much older time during Olmec civilization, which preceded the Mayans.The Mesoamerican civilization’s chocolate a bitter drink made from a variety of local ingredients mixed with ground cacao beans.

An officer serving with Cortes observed Motecuhzoma, who was the ruler of the Aztecs.  They found that Montezuma was drinking 50 flagons of chocolate every day. This beverage, which was sometimes made with wine or water, could be seasoned with chili pepper, vanilla, and pimiento.  It was known to cure diarrhea and dysentery.  It also was believed to be an aphrodisiac.  Cortez is known to have tried the beverage, but he found it too bitter.  However he did write to King Carlos the first of Spain, calling “xocoatl” a “beverage that builds up resistance and fights fatigue.” Etymologists trace the origin of the word “chocolate” to the Aztec word “xocoatl,” which referred to a bitter drink brewed from cacao beans. The Latin name for the cacao tree, Theobroma cacao, means “food of the gods.”

Bean of the gods
Bean of the gods

For several centuries in pre-modern Latin America, cacao beans were considered valuable enough to use as currency. One bean could be traded for a tamale, while 100 beans could purchase a good turkey hen, according to a 16th-century Aztec document.

Both the Mayans and Aztecs believed the cacao bean had magical, or even divine, properties, suitable for use in the most sacred rituals of birth, marriage and death. According to Chloe Doutre-Roussel’s book The Chocolate Connoisseur, Aztec sacrifice victims who felt too melancholy to join in ritual dancing before their death were often given a gourd of chocolate (tinged with the blood of previous victims) to cheer them up.
cacao10
Roasted Cacao Beans

Sweetened chocolate didn’t appear until Europeans discovered the Americas and sampled the native cuisine. Legend has it that the Aztec king Montezuma welcomed the Spanish explorer Hernando Cortes with a banquet that included drinking chocolate, having tragically mistaken him for a reincarnated deity instead of a conquering invader. Chocolate didn’t suit the foreigners’ taste buds at first –one described it in his writings as “a bitter drink for pigs” – but once mixed with honey or cane sugar, it quickly became popular throughout Spain.

Both the Mayans and Aztecs believed the cacao bean had magical, or even divine, properties, suitable for use in the most sacred rituals of birth, marriage and death. According to Chloe Doutre-Roussel’s book The Chocolate Connoisseur, Aztec sacrifice victims who felt too melancholy to join in ritual dancing before their death were often given a gourd of chocolate (tinged with the blood of previous victims) to cheer them up.

Chocolate after Colonialization
By the 17th century, chocolate was a fashionable drink throughout Europe, believed to have nutritious, medicinal and even aphrodisiac properties (it’s rumored that Casanova was especially fond of the stuff).But it remained largely a privilege of the rich until the invention of the steam engine made mass production possible in the late 1700s.

Bibliography:
  •  “The True History of Chocolate”, authors Sophie and Michael Coe
  • “The Chocolate Connoisseur” Chloe Doutre- Roussel.
  •  “Traités nouveaux & curieux du café du thé et du chocolate”, by Philippe Sylvestre Dufour, 1685.

 More about the History of Chocolate and Chocolate Recipes in Mexican Cuisine in next installment  of Sabrina’s Latin Kitchen.

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